Hibbitt & Barnes Family History


Stephen DANDO - (abt. 1770 - 1851)

The exact date of Stephen DANDO's birth is uncertain but he was born in Rodborough, Gloucestershire, in probably about 1769/1770, the son of John DANDO and Ann (nee BROTHERS). He was baptized on 26th August 1770 in Rodborough Calvinistic Methodist Tabernacle.

A video clip of Rodborough Tabernacle and The Little Chapel is available in the Gallery.

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Stephen was mentioned in the will of his father, John DANDO, dated 13th October 1809 which was proved on 10th February 1810. An excerpt follows...

..."I give and bequeath to each of my other children Stephen Dando John Dando Jehoida Dando and Sarah Phillips the sum of Seventy Pounds..."

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Stephen emigrated to America in 1785, taking the family hat manufacturing business to an international level. He remained a religious man all of his life. The following information was published in 1858 in the 'Lost Chapters Recovered from the Early History of American Methodism' by J B Wakeley - pages 566-567...

Stephen Dando was born in 1767, and died December 28, 1851, aged eighty-five years. He came to America in 1785, and united with the John-street Church in 1787, when John Dickens was the pastor. Mr. Dando often heard John and Charles Wesley preach. Their preaching had quite an influence on him, and he used to refer to it in after life. He belonged to the first Board of Managers of the Missionary Society, and was a projector of the first Sabbath school held in New-York. He possessed much of the spirit of Stephen of old, whose name he bore. His beautiful white locks were an ornament of grace, for they were found in the way of righteousness. At the time of his death he had been sixty-five years a member of John-street Church. He was an old and beloved disciple.

Stephen's aunt Mary, who had arrived in America two years before him, looked after his household. The same publication as above printed the following...

Mary Dando was an old member of John-street, who is still remembered...Though never married, she voluntarily assumed the care of a number of orphan children, performing for them the duties of a mother as well as she could, while she took the oversight of the household of her nephew, Stephen Dando.

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Stephen set up a hat store at 3 Maiden Lane near Broadway, New York, in 1798 and moved to No. 11 the following year where his brother, Samuel, accompanied him. The Old Merchants of New York City, Vol 5, by Walter Barrett, clerk, published the following extract in 1885. The writer had mistaken Stephen's aunt, Mary, for his mother...

Mr. Norsworthy [a merchant who arrived in New York in 1794] stood six feet two inches high, and was well proportioned. He wore a low-crowned hat, made by Dando. They made his hats for thirty years. When he arrived here he found Mary Dando, the widow, living at 166 William street, where she kept a china store. In 1798, Stephen Dando started a hat store at 3 Maiden lane, where his mother resided. Next year Stephen took in his brother Sam at No. 11 Maiden lane. Stephen made the first hat for Mr. Norsworthy in 1798, and Samuel, who outlived his brother, made his last hat in 1828.

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Stephen was still at 11 Maiden Lane in 1808, he was listed in 'Longworth's American Almanac, New York Register and City Directory' as follows...

Dando Stephen, hat store 11 Maiden-lane

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Stephen first appeared in New York immigration documentation in 1799 and then again in 1802 and became naturalized on 28 April 1802. The Court of Common Pleas recorded the following information in their indexes...

Name: Stephen Dando 
Naturalization Date: 28 Apr 1802 
Former Nationality: Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 
Title and Location of Court: Common Pleas Court, New York County 
Volume: 3 
Record Number: 258
Address of Naturalized Person: City of NY
Occupation: Hatter
Witness to Naturalization: William Mayell, City of New York, Hatter

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Stephen DANDO evidently met the famous radical propagandist, Thomas Paine, who died in 1809. What follows is a letter to the editor of 'The Liberator (Boston, MA)' from one EJ Webb, dated 1st July 1848 and published on Friday 9th May 1851. The writer appears to have known Stephen DANDO for a long time and thought of him as a decent and honest but misguided man who, in his opinion, had been used by a number of clergymen to deride the memory of Thomas Paine, whom the writer much admired...

FOR THE INVESTIGATOR

Thomas Paine.

    MR. EDITOR :-I noticed in your paper of June 28th, that some insignificant professor of the prevailing faith had signified to you his astonishment that any decent man should defend a person of "such notoriously filthy habits as Thomas Paine" was said to possess. The said insignificant professor of the weakest faith that ever deluded a mortal being is not alone. A few weeks since, a gentleman, once a Unitarian preacher, and conversant with my scepticism, handed me a document cut from the Christian Advocate and Journal, dated Jan. 2d, 1847, which I should have noticed before had not business prevented. My friend, in a note, desired me to notice the said publication, observing that from all he knew of THOMAS PAINE, his character for honor and integrity was preferable to nine out of every ten clergymen ; and further stated, that they sought to defame Mr. Paine, because they detested the principles of Liberty and Equality which he so ably advocated.
    The slip from the Advocate, is signed by a Stephen Dando, an old gentleman of New York, whom I have known over thirty years–a very pious manufacturer of men's hats. The old gentleman is one of the easy kind, and during the Methodist Conference in the city, whenever it occurred, usually boarded at his table from fifteen to twenty pious preaching brethren, and their attendants. From brother Dando's expenses exceeding his income, his resources failed ; still, our brother's name was used to sign a document derogatory to the standing of Mr. Paine as a particularly clean man, and one easily approached by a posse of canting hypocrites. The scene is laid at the house where the philosopher breathed his last ; and whatever may have been his habits, his answers to a Mr. Ward, a Methodist preacher, redound to his honor. Mr. W. endeavoured to warn him of the awful consequences of falling into the hands of the living God. Mr. P. answered-"I did not know that I ever was out of his hands." Ward, it appears, asked Mr. Paine several insignificant questions, and with his brother retired. Brother Dando loitered behind. Mr. P. asked him who that man was? Dando replied, "a Methodist preacher." Paine instantly exclaimed, "I thought so." Friend D. then said, "shall brother Ward visit you as a minister?" "No," he quickly replied, "I am my own minister. I ask no assistance from any human being, in a spiritual way." It appears by the narrative, that brother Dando was induced to make a second visit to Mr. Paine on the following day ; but, as our brother observes, the enemies of the gospel had been there ; of course there was no admittance.
    It seems that after Mr. Paine has been dead nearly forty years, the virulence of the priesthood is unabated ; for not succeeding with Mr. Paine in their endeavors to warp his opinion, they hold a long discourse with a Mrs. Turner, at whose house our worthy was abiding ; and though Mr. Paine's opinions could not be changed, an attack is made on a dying man's habits, as is said to be related by the lady above named. For the malignity of the uncharitable craft, poor Dando is selected as the accuser. It is my firm belief that STEPHEN DANDO is an honest man of good meaning, but of weak capacity. And the silly story of Paine's habits in his death-bed sickness, propagated by the priesthood, is conclusive evidence that with the clergy generally there is no charity.
"Kings, priests, and statesmen, blast the human flower,
Even in its tender bud ; their influence darts
Like subtle poison through the bloodless veins
Of desolate society."-[Shelley’s "Queen Mab."
                            Yours, truly,
                                       E.J. WEBB
New York, July 1 1848.

[The Liberator (1831-1865) was an abolitionist newspaper founded by William Lloyd Garrison in 1831.]

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It seems that Stephen had a sideline in imports for he placed four advertisements in the 'National Advocate' during December 1816, stating...

BRISTOL WARE
IMPORTED in the ship Chauncey, from Bristol, 12 crates Bristol Ware, consisting of
Blue print Sugar Oval Boxes
Oval Cream Jugs, Pint and Quart Jugs
Oval Basins, &c.
A liberal credit will be given on the above.
De 19 1w         STEPHEN DANDO

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In 1822, Stephen's hat store was located at No. 9 Maiden Lane. The following advert for his hats appeared in 'The New York American' on 19th February of that year...

OVAL HATS
STEPHEN DANDO, at his Fashionable HAT STORE, No 9 Maiden-Lane, near Broadway, continues to manufacture and sell wholesale and retail, Gentlemens’ Black and Drab Beaver, Castor, and Imitation Hats; Youths’, Boys and Childrens’ Fancy do, - Wool Hats, Trimmings, Bowstrings, Paper, &c for Hatters.
As the Oval Hats are now become fashionable, S.D. informs his friends that he has now engaged Mr. T. JONES, late in the employ of Mr. Nathl Dando, 42 Cheapside, London, who was the original inventor of the Oval Hat – S.D. therefore, with some degree of confidence, looks for a share of public patronage. 
Feb 1y-3m

...Nathaniel DANDO was Stephen's first cousin and ran the hat manufacturing enterprise in London, whilst his brother, Joseph, was based in Bristol.

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Later in 1822, Stephen DANDO almost certainly contracted yellow fever during the outbreak in New York in that year. 'The Nic-Nac or Oracle of Knowledge' produced the following in 1824...

HATS.- We select the following, as a specimen of American Advertisements, from the "New-York Daily Advertiser," 18th Nov. 1822:- Gratitude prompts the subscriber to return his friends thanks for the many favours he has received from them while in exile with his fellow citizens, and now particularly solicits a continuance of the same, at his old established and well known Hat Store, Maiden Lane near Broadway, where every attention will be shown them, and where they may be served in the best manner.
    In the order of a wise Providence, it has been permitted him at a late period to contract a slight degree of the sickness, and although removed from its dangerous effects, yet a certain degree of debility remains, which will render it inexpedient for him to return immediately to his personal exertions – yet his business is in such trust-worthy hands, the public may rest assured of their being suited with any or most articles in his line : and as the price is always fixed, but few words, it is hoped, on the part of the purchaser or seller, will be necessary.

STEPHEN DANDO.

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In 1824, Stephen held the office of Steward for the Male Assistance Society, a Christian charity for the benefit of the poor.

And in the November of that year he sat on the Committee to judge Men's Hats at the Fair of the New York Mechanic and Scientific Institution. The 'National Advocate' published the following on 16th November 1824...

Fair of the New-York Mechanic and Scientific
Institution.

    The managers of this institution inform their fellow-citizens, that the proposed Fair and Exhibition of Domestic Manufactures will be held at the State Arsenal, corner of Franklin and Elm-streets. A committee will attend at that place this morning, at 10 o’clock, and continue there during, the day, to receive articles for exhibition. The judges appointed to inspect the articles, will examine them on Wednesday.-- The public exhibition and sale will take place on Thursday the 18th. For those articles that shall be deemed by the judges the best of their kind offered, a premium certificate will be awarded, to be signed by the president and secretary of the society. The certificate will be a copper plate engraving, and presented in a gilt frame. A printed copy of the proposed articles may be obtained of Mr. Thomas Richards, No. 240 Pearl-street. To the list heretofore published, has been added,
    For the best 50 sides oak tanned Sole Leather,
           do           do     hemlock tanned    do
    The following gentlemen have been appointed judges to examine the goods and make the awards.
    Committee on Woollen Goods, Wm. Partridge, Jas. Oakley, Caleb 0. Halsted, Jonathan Waterbury, V. B. Waldron.
    Committee on Cotton Goods, B. Tiffany, T.B. Wakeman, Daniel Pope, Prosper M. Whetmore, Abm. Prall.
    Committee on Silks and Leghorns. Abm. B. Mead, Aaron Fountain, Pierre Flandin.
    Committee on ……per, Jonathan Seymour, Robert Bartow, P. ?. Mesier.
    Committee on Printing, Isaac Collins, Wm. Wood. Mr. Clayton.
    Committee on Iron, Brass, and Shot, Chas. Osborn, Henry M’Farlan, Christopher Wolfe, Wm. W. Mott, Alex. Morgan.
    Committee on Leather and Leather Goods, Thos. P. Bowne, Montgomery Rankin, Peter M’Carty, James Jarvis, John Tonnally.
    Committee on Glass, Mr. Cook, Ebenezer Caldwell, Mr. Grace.
    Committee on Stone Statuary, Earthenware, &c. Mr. O. Wilder, John Griscomb, John R. Murray.
    Committee on Sail Duck, Abm. Fardon, Stephen Burdett, Edward Arrowsmith.
    Committee on Men’s Hats, Pierre Teller, Thos. Haines. Stephen Dando.
    Committee on Miscellaneous Articles, the Board of Managers. 

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The 1997 publication, 'New York University and the city: an illustrated history' by Thomas J. Frusciano and Marilyn H. Pettit, mentions how Stephen DANDO'S shop moved around New York during the 1820's...

'New York University and the city: an illustrated history' by Thomas J. Frusciano and Marilyn H. Pettit

External Link To the Book on Google Books

BROADWAY AT CANAL STREET WAS A MUDDY, BRIDGED DRAINAGE DITCH IN 1821, CARRYING WATER FROM A FRESHWATER POND (OVER WHICH THE TOMBS WAS LATER BUILT) WESTWARD THROUGH LISPENARD'S MEADOWS TO THE HUDSON RIVER. BY 1835 IT WAS A PAVED, BUSTLING, COMMERCIAL STREET. IN THIS ETCHING, BROADWAY STRETCHES NORTHWARD FROM CANAL STREET TO JUST BEYOND PRESENT-DAY PRINCE STREET. AN ICE WAGON IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND DISPENSES ICE CUT IN BLOCKS AND STORED FROM THE PREVIOUS WINTER, AND THE HUBBUB IN THE BACKGROUND ON THE LEFT IS TATTERSALL’S HORSE AND CARRIAGE MARKET, BETWEEN HOWARD AND GRAND STREETS. A STAGE COACH FROM GREENWICH VILLAGE TO WALL STREET ENTERS FROM THE WEST, AND UPHOLSTERERS, "SEGAR" MAKERS, AND WIG MAKERS DISPLAY THEIR WARES. HATMAKER STEPHEN DANDO FOLLOWED THE CITY’S GROWTH UPTOWN, MOVING HIS SHOP FROM MAIDEN LANE IN 1825 TO NASSAU STREET IN 1826, THEN ACCORDING TO THIS IMAGE, TO CANAL STREET, ALTHOUGH THE LONGWORTH CITY DIRECTORY FOR 1829 LISTS HIS SHOP ADDRESS AS 282 BLEECKER.
   NIBLO'S GARDENS, FORMERLY COLUMBIA GARDENS, OCCUPIES THE EAST SIDE OF BROADWAY BETWEEN PRINCE AND HOUSTON, AND PROPERTY ADJACENT TO IT WAS PROPOSED INITIALLY AS THE SITE OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY. IN 1843, NIBLO'S THEATRE PRESENTED THE FIRST BALLET IN THE UNITED STATES "THE BLACK CROOK," AND AUDIENCES FLOCKED TO THE SHOCKING SIGHT OF THE UNDISGUISED FEMALE FIGURE ON STAGE.

...Although the excerpt states that Stephen's shop appears in the above picture, it doesn't seem to be clear enough to spot.

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In August 1827, Stephen advertised twice in the 'New-York Spectator'...

STEPHEN DANDO, at his Hat Store, in Nassau-street, near Maiden lane, offers for sale, gentlemen's fashionable Black and Drab Beaver, and Plated or Imitation HATS, wholesale and retail, on the most reasonable terms, for cash, or good paper.
jy 7-C2wS1m

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Stephen DANDO evidently held anti-slavery views. Perhaps he had something in common with Thomas Paine after all as the anonymous 1775 article, "African Slavery in America", believed to be written by Paine, is said to be the first article published in what would become the United States, which advocated abolishing slavery and freeing the slaves. The 'New-York Spectator' printed the following extract on 17th December 1830...

African Repository and Colonial Journal.- This is an interesting periodical, issued monthly, at Washington, under the direction of the Managers of the American Colonization, Society. lts object is indicated by its title, and its pages are exclusively devoted to publications, foreign and domestic, connected with the proceedings of the Society at home, and the progress and affairs of the Colony abroad. Mr. Stephen Dando is the agent of this work for the city of New York. See the advertisement.

Wikipedia elaborates on the American Colonization Society...

"The American Colonization Society (in full, The Society for the Colonization of Free People of Color of America), founded in 1816, was the primary vehicle to support the "return" of free African Americans to what was considered greater freedom in Africa. It helped to found the colony of Liberia in 1821-22 as a place for freedmen...

"...In March 1825, the ACS began a quarterly, The African Repository and Colonial Journal, edited by Rev. Ralph Randolph Gurley (1797–1872), who headed the Society until 1844. Conceived as the Society's propaganda organ, the Repository promoted both colonization and Liberia. Among the items printed were articles about Africa, letters of praise, official dispatches stressing the prosperity and steady growth of the colony, information about emigrants, and lists of donors."

And further information is available at this Wikipedia page...

"During the 1820s and 1830s the American Colonization Society (A.C.S.) was the primary vehicle for proposals to return black Americans to freedom in Africa. It had broad support nationwide among white people, including prominent leaders such as Abraham Lincoln, Henry Clay and James Monroe, who saw this as preferable to emancipation...Clay argued that as blacks could never be fully integrated into society due to "unconquerable prejudice" by white Americans, it would be better for them to emigrate to Africa. There was however, considerable opposition among African Americans, many of whom did not see colonization as a viable or acceptable solution to their daunting problems in the United States...

"...After a series of attempts to plant small settlements on the coast of West Africa, the A.C.S. established the colony of Liberia in 1821–22. Over the next four decades, it assisted thousands of former slaves and free black people to move there from the United States. The disease environment they encountered was extreme, and most of the migrants died fairly quickly. Enough survived to declare independence in 1847. American support for colonization waned gradually through the 1840s and 1850s, largely because of the efforts of abolitionists to promote emancipation of slaves and granting of American citizenship."

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A concern for the poor and needy continued to be a quality of Stephen DANDO's as the article in the 'New-York Spectator' on 21st October 1831 bears out...

CASE OF EXTREME DISTRESS

    A man, with his wife and nine children, lately from England, are now living at the corner of 36th street and the 8th avenue. They are all sick with typhus fever and fever and ague except two, and entirely destitute.
    Any donations will be thankfully received by them or for their use by Stephen Dando, 27 Spruce street ; Wm. Simpson, S.E. corner of Washington and Canal streets ; or Jos. Jennings, Foreign Emigrant Office, 46 Sixth street.
*** Donations left at the office of the Commercial Advertiser will be applied to the relief of this distressed family.

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Stephen became an agent for the 'Christian Advocate and Journal', and in 1833, he was listed in the 'New York As It Is In 1833 and Citizens' Advertising Directory' as...

Dando, Stephen, Methodist bookstore, and agent for the Christian Advocate and Journal, 29 Spruce-street

'The New York City Directory' of 1842-1843 published...

Dando Stephen, agent for Christian Advocate, 401 Pearl

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In 1834, Stephen DANDO was continuing his interests in the abolitionist movement. The 'New-York Spectator' published the following on 15th September...

LIFE OF ASHMUN.- We are happy to learn that the life of this eminent individual by the Rev. R.R. Gurley, is soon to be published. The biographer is in every way qualified to do justice to the virtual founder of Liberia – a man as remarkable for his great and origina powers of mind, as for his fervent piety, active benevolence and purity of heart. The work will contain not only the life of Mr. Ashmun, but will embody the history of Liberia from its purchase and settlement to the present time. Subscriptions for it are received by Stephen Dando, No. 29 Spruce street.

Wikipedia tells us who Mr. Ashmun was...

"Jehudi Ashmun (April 21, 1794 – August 25, 1828) was a religious leader and social reformer who became involved in the American Colonization Society. He served as the United States government's representative to the Liberian colony in its second decade and its governor (1824-1828)."

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Part of a letter sent to Stephen in 1838 was published in 'The Emancipator, New York' on 6th December of that year...

Will the Christian Advocate and Journal copy this?

    Extract of a letter from Rev. James Cox, Wesleyan Methodist Missionary at St. Johns, Antigua, and Ruling Preacher on the Island, to Mr. STEPHEN DANDO, of this city, dated Oct. 18, 1838.
    "The sham slavery apprentice system" of which you speak, is abolished The people now have unqualified emancipation in all the islands of these seas. It never existed in Antigua. The Legislature gave their people freedom on the 1st of August, 1834. The island is in PROSPERITY. Our people are peaceful and industrious. The estates are all cultivated. Intelligence and Religion are spreading in every direction.
    "I feel much interested in the efforts now making in your widely extended country to 'proclaim liberty to all the people thereof;' and I should be very glad also to receive from you a periodical giving me intelligence about the progress of Anti-Slavery and Literary Societies, or other institutions for general benefit. Could you send me a copy of Mr. Thome's work on the West Indies, which has excited so much interest!"

[The book mentioned in the letter was entitled, 'Emancipation in the West Indies: A Six months' Tour in Antigua, Barbadoes, and Jamaica in the Year 1837' by James A. Thome and J. Horace Kimball.]

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Stephen's  election to the Board of Managers for the Methodist Missionary Society came in April 1839 and in 1842, he was selling, from his premises at 401 Pearl Street, a book entitled 'A Complete and Infallible System of Practical Book-keeping', written by his nephew, Joseph Dando (1802-1870).

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In 1847, 'The Methodist Quarterly Review' published the following article regarding a visitor to Stephen's brother, Joseph. The name of the author is unknown...

It will not be out of place to observe before we take our leave of Bristol, that we were politely invited by Mr. Dando to partake of the hospitalities of his house. He resides in a most beautiful mansion on "Ashly Down," a fine elevated situation which overlooks the city. Here we had a most quiet and comfortable resting place during most of our stay in Bristol. Mr. Dando has three interesting daughters, one of whom, in particular, is a great admirer of Robert Hall, and has in keeping a hat which he wore, and which she did us the honor to place upon our head. Mr. Dando, the younger, was our guide to the wonders of Bristol; and, together with his excellent lady,-who, by the way, is a Philadelphian,-showed us and our fellow-travelers much attention, for which they are entitled to our gratitude. But for all these kindnesses we ought to confess our obligations to our old friend Stephen Dando of New-York, who was so kind as to herald our coming to Bristol to his respected brother and nephew.

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Stephen was listed in New York in the 1850 US census as follows...

Name: Stephen Dando 
Residence: New York City, ward 7, New York, New York 
Age: 80 years 
Calculated Birth Year: 1770 
Birthplace: England 
Gender: Male 
Profession: Agent for C Advocate
Film Number: 17115 
Digital GS Number: 4189780 
Image Number: 00315 
Line Number: 27 
Dwelling House Number: 922 
Family Number: 2162

Household: Gender, Age 
Stephen Dando, M, 80y 
Sophia Enard, F, 46y

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Stephen died on 28th December 1851. The 'Bristol Mercury' published the following notice on 24th January 1852, by then, the news having reached his brother, Joseph...

Died - Dec. 28, at New York, aged 83, Mr. Stephen Dando, a long resident of that city, and brother of Mr. Joseph Dando, of Ashley-hill, Bristol.

 

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