Archive for March 2011

Those Places Thursday - The M1 motorway - old photos

Category: Grandpa's Old Slides

Old signpost to the M1 Motorway

The M1 Motorway
Click the image above to see a larger version.

Most of the M1 motorway was opened between 1959 and 1968. These photographs were probably taken some time during that period. Look, no central reservation barrier! If only the traffic flow was still like this today.

I'd be very interested to know if anyone can tell me the exact location of this bridge.

(From my grandpa's collection of old slides - see this post for more information.)

[Why Those Places Thursday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Ancestry.co.uk extends its free census access

Category: General

Due to some technical problems, Ancestry.co.uk is extending its free access to the censuses until midnight on Monday 28th March (UK time). (See this post for previous information.)

Family Recipe Friday: Nougat

Category: Mrs Beeton's Cookery Books

(This recipe comes from my great-grandmother's 1909 publication of 'Mrs Beeton's Every-Day Cookery' - see this post for more information.)

NOUGAT
INGREDIENTS.-¾ lb. of best castor sugar, ½ lb. of almonds, 1 dessertspoonful of lemon-juice.

METHOD.-Blanche and chop the almonds coarsely, dry them thoroughly in the oven, but do not let them brown. Place the sugar and lemon-juice in a copper sugar boiler or stewpan, stir with a spatula or wooden spoon until it acquires a pale brown colour, and add the prepared almonds. Turn on to an oiled slab, press it out with a hot wet knife, mark into small squares, and when cold break them apart.

[Why Family Recipe Friday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Follow Friday: Scottish 1911 Census arriving on 5th April

Category: General

The Registrar General for Scotland has announced that the 1911 census for Scotland will be released on Tuesday 5 April 2011. This will be available at ScotlandsPeople.

This census details information collected from more than 4.7 million Scots and the records will include the name, address, age, occupation, birthplace and marital status of everyone counted in the census, as well as details about their children. For the first time, the census data will be presented in full colour rather than black and white.

Unlike in England and Wales, the individual household schedules for the Scottish 1911 census have been destroyed so it will not be possible to view these. Instead the enumeration books have been digitised, similar to that for the 1901 census, except that the entries for each person go across a double page. This includes the 'fertility' questions for married women, that is years married, number of children and how many were still alive.

Payment will be by pay-per-view credits - there is no plan to introduce subscriptions. It will cost 1 credit to view an index entry for the 1911 census. An image will cost 5 credits. If you live in Scotland, you'll be able to obtain credits at a reduced price from your local library. There is a little publicised Scotlands People Voucher Scheme which allows public libraries to sell discounted vouchers directly to the public for non-commercial use. You have to visit the library in person.

[Why Follow Friday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Site Updates - Surnames: Smale, Doidge, Powell, Fisher, Smith

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Thrifty Thursday: Free census access at Ancestry on 27th March

Category: General

Ancestry.co.uk are making their England, Wales and Scotland census index records available for free for 24 hours on the 27th March, which is the night that the 2011 census will be taken.

To view the original pages for England and Wales you'll need to select one of their membership options or pay-as-you-go. However, Ancestry do offer a 14 day free trial so you could always choose that option first.

[Why Thrifty Thursday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Wisdom Wednesday: How to clean wallpaper

Category: Mrs Beeton's Cookery Books

(From my gran's 1894 publication of 'Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book and Household Guide' - see this post for more information.)

WALL PAPER, TO CLEAN.

If not very dirty, tie a soft clean cloth over a long soft broom and brush the walls with it in straight lines ; if, however, the paper be very much soiled, stale bread should be used to cleanse it. Cut a stale quartern loaf in thick slices and rub the paper very lightly with it, going always in one direction and discarding the bread when dirty. Dough may be used instead of bread ; and in either case it is best first to take off all the dust from the paper in the way described above with a broom.

[Why Wisdom Wednesday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Wordless Wednesday - Avon Dam, near South Brent - old photos

Category: Grandpa's Old Slides

Avon Dam, near Brentor, Devon
Click the image for a larger version.

This photograph is of the Avon Dam on Dartmoor, not far from South Brent, and was taken in June 1966. There are more photos in the collection which were taken on the same day and it would appear to have been a family day out. I'm in some of the pictures, aged 3.

(From my grandpa's collection of old slides - see this post for more information.)

[Why Wordless Wednesday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

More records from Ireland at Ancestry

Category: General

Ancestry have expanded their Irish collections:

Griffiths Valuation,1848-1864
UPDATED - One of the most important surviving 19th century genealogical resources for Ireland, this collection of over 2.5 million records offers a snapshot of ancestors who rented land or property throughout Ireland in the 1850s.

Tithe Applotment Books, 1823-1837
UPDATED - In 1823 a law was enacted requiring all land holders to pay a tax or "tithe" to the Church of Ireland, regardless of their religious affiliation. With details like tithe payer, acreage of their land and amount of their tithe, these records in effect provide a census of pre-famine Ireland.

Lawrence Collection of Photographs, 1870-1910
NEW - This collection of 20,000 images showcases the length and breadth of Ireland through the eyes of William Lawrence's photography studio in Dublin.

Ordnance Survey Maps, 1824-1846
NEW - Almost 2,000 incredibly detailed six-inch-to-the-mile maps of almost the whole of Ireland were produced before and during the Great Famine and take you practically to the spot where your ancestor lived and worked.

Family Recipe Friday: Pickled Nasturtiums

Category: Mrs Beeton's Cookery Books

(This recipe comes from my gran's 1894 publication of 'Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book and Household Guide' - see this post for more information.)

PICKLED NASTURTIUMS (a very good substitute for Capers).
INGREDIENTS.- To each pint of vinegar 1 oz. salt, 6 peppercorns, nasturtiums.

Mode.- Gather the nasturtium pods on a dry day, and wipe them clean with a cloth ; put them in a dry glass bottle with vinegar, salt, and pepper as above. If you cannot find enough ripe to fill a bottle, cork up what you have got until more are fit : they may be added from day to day. Bung up the bottle, and seal or resin the tops. They will be fit for use in 10 or 12 months ; and the best way to make them one season for the next.
Seasonable.-Look for nasturtium-pods from the end of July to the end of August.


Illustration from the book.

[Why Family Recipe Friday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Treasure Chest Thursday: Grannies' 'Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book'

Category: Mrs Beeton's Cookery Books

I have in my possession two volumes of Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book which have been handed down to me. Both books are old and well used, one originally having been owned by one of my maternal great-grandmothers, Florence Weaver, nee Smale, and the other by my paternal grandmother, Ivy Alice Hibbitt, nee Dando, and perhaps her mother before her.


The 1894 Edition on the left was owned by my grandmother, Ivy Alice Dando.
The 1909 Edition on the right belonged to my great-grandmother, Florence Smale.

The oldest of the books is an edition published in 1894 (pictured on the left) and its full title is 'Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book and Household Guide'. The hardback cover states 'One Shilling Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book New & Enlarged Edition'. Inside the front cover are a number of loose recipes which my grandmother presumably collected over the years, although they are not all written in her handwriting. The contents of the book include the following sections; The Cook's Time Table, Invalid Cookery, Hints to Prevent Waste, American Cookery, Table Decorations and Marketing......Read more »

Wordless Wednesday - Clovelly, Devon - old photos

Category: Grandpa's Old Slides


Click the image for a larger version.


Click the image for a larger version.

These pictures of Clovelly in North Devon probably date from the 1950's or 1960's.

(From my grandpa's collection of slides - see this post for more information.)

[Why Wordless Wednesday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Tuesday's Tip: Marriage Settlements in England & Wales

Category: Handy Family History Links

Wedding RingsAnother family history researcher recently sent me a transcript of a marriage settlement involving my Dando line. As these documents can be a little confusing I decided to search for a useful online guide and came across the following link among the Learning Resources at FamilySearch:

Marriage Settlements in England and Wales

[Why Tuesday's Tip? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

(Image: Salvatore Vuono / FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

FindMyPast.co.uk latest additions

Category: General

You can now search 60,523 Bank of England Wills Extracts covering the period 1717-1845 on findmypast.co.uk.

They've also published 54,722 new Lincolnshire parish marriage records spanning the period 1700 to 1837 which cover a total of 139 parishes. View the full list of parishes here.

Search for your Yorkshire ancestors in 40,029 new baptism, marriage and burial records. New parishes covered are:

Warmfield St Peters
Ossett Holy Trinity
Sandal St Helens
Alverthorpe St Pauls
Royston St Johns
Wrenthorpe Chapel
St John & St Michaels
Horbury St Peters
Wakefield All Saints
Flockton St James

TheGenealogist.co.uk recent additions

Category: General

The London Illustrated News

TheGenealogist.co.uk has started to release The London Illustrated News for Diamond subscribers. They have added 6 months' worth of the weekly newspaper from 1890 to the site so far with more to follow. They are bookmarked by article and are easily searchable, containing many announcements of Births, Marriages, Deaths, Obituaries, Wills & Bequests.

Birth Transcripts 1973-2005

TheGenealogist.co.uk have now added over 7.6 million birth transcripts, bringing the total number of birth records to over 28 million. They've added these records to a new tool that lets you search across all their Birth, Marriage and Death transcripts with built in SmartSearch technology, automatically showing partner's full name where available, and enabling you to find potential parents from a birth, potential children to a marriage and potential birth records from a death record.

The 2011 Census - family history in the making

Category: Making Memories

The 2011 CensusMy household questionnaire for the 2011 England and Wales Census arrived this week and after thumbing through it I decided to put down a few of my thoughts, from a genealogical point of view that is.

This is your chance to be part of history. Many family historians appreciate the invaluable information contained within the 19th and early 20th century censuses, which are currently available to them. Although these records may contain only basic information they do help us to locate our ancestors and glimpse at their lifestyles via their addresses and occupations.

Turning to the new 2011 census, whilst it does supply a great deal more detail for the future genealogist, I was surprised and dismayed to find that middle names are to be omitted, although full dates of birth are required. Again, a specific place of birth is not requested, only the country. I began to worry for our descendants that they'll have a difficult time tracking down ancestors with common names who were born in England or Wales, etc.

Of course, by then, who knows what other sources will become available to support the particulars they find on us in the census? For instance, might they have access to old household bills in the same way that we can view old telephone and street directories now, or will this type of material still be viewed as confidential in 100 years or so?

What about our personal musings on Twitter, Facebook and the like? And of course, our websites and blogs? The Internet Archive is busy recording much of what it finds online by means of its 'Wayback Machine'. The 'Machine' has already captured my own family history site twice. Imagine how our descendants might feel if they search for their ancestors, to find all our efforts pop up on their screens (assuming screens are still in use at that stage) after we, and our websites, are long gone!

In view of this, why not publish your own reflections as you complete your census forms and maybe one day your future relatives might search for and discover this personal account to compliment your household schedule. You could post to your blog or to your favourite social networking site or even ask a friend to put your thoughts on their pages if you don't have access to these facilities.

We have a choice of whether to complete the 2011 census online or post back our paper questionnaires. In trying to decide which method to choose I endeavoured to find out what would become of our paper questionnaires. Apparently, they are to be destroyed after they have been scanned. However, images of the actual questionnaires are to be securely stored on microfilm and kept confidential for the usual 100 years. Therefore, if you like the idea of your descendants seeing your own hand (albeit printed) and signature, then you might want to use the old-fashioned method and put pen to paper.

You could copy or scan your questionnaire before sending it back and keep it in your family archive. Then perhaps some of those who come after you won't have to wait 100 years to discover that you have gas central heating!

Those Places Thursday: Trafalgar Square, London - old photos

Category: Grandpa's Old Slides


Click the image for a larger version.

This photograph was most likely taken by my gran, Ivy Alice Hibbitt, nee Dando, probably some time during the 1960's. She would sometimes visit London with friends.

(From my grandpa's collection of slides - see this post for more information.)

[Why Those Places Thursday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Thankful Thursday: Digitizing Grandpa's Old Slides

Category: Grandpa's Old Slides

My parents recently produced two boxes of colour slides, which had been stored away in their house for a number of years. The slides consisted of photos taken by my paternal grandparents, ranging from the 1930's to the early 1970's, including family pictures and places they visited. My grandpa enjoyed photography and from time to time he'd convert the bathroom into a temporary dark room.


Eager to view these images I set about scanning them with my Epson Perfection V200 Photo scanner, which has a slide scanning facility, and I was pleasantly surprised with the quality of the results. The software allows for colour restoration and backlight correction as well as other fine-tuning features. Even the darkest of slides rendered a viewable picture......Read more »