Those Places Thursday: Planned Plymouth History Centre - have your say!

Category: General

You can have your say in the plans for the intended Plymouth Historic and Cultural Centre by completing an online survey which is available at http://www.plymouth.gov.uk/historycentre. You don't need to live in Plymouth, or even in Devon or the UK, to participate in the survey so if you have an interest in Plymouth's heritage, then please get involved. The closing date for completing the survey is 27th October.

Full details of the planned project, agreed by the City Council on 3rd September 2013, can be found here.

For Plymouth locals there will be a 'pop-up museum' in the Drake Circus Shopping Mall where you can forward your ideas. The pop-up museum will be in the atrium (outside Starbucks and Primark) from 10am until 4pm on Saturday 26, Sunday 27, Monday 28 and Tuesday 29 October. Read more here.

Pop-Up Museum Banner

[Why Those Places Thursday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Friday Funny: Church font doubles as a dust-pan

Category: Ancestors Corner

Today's amusing anecdote is attributed to Aaron Taysum (abt. 1780-1851) who was the parish clerk in Arlingham, Gloucestershire, taking over the role from his father after he died in 1807.

In 1886, John Sayer, the son of a former vicar of Arlingham, published his writings which were again republished in 2008 in a book called 'Antiquities of Arlingham'. Apparently Aaron Taysum utilized a metal basin as a dust-pan. The following excerpt reveals how this basin had previously been used as a font

"The font, as all parishioners know, is of modern work; the elder ones will remember that before this font was placed in the church the wooden structure now adapted as an alms box, and which was provided with a silver basin, was given for this purpose by Lady Mill, then living at the Court, and the representative of the Yate family, and superseded an ancient pewter or metal basin, which had been doing duty for a font, and which subsequently the writer recollects, was used by the clerk, Aaron Taysum, for a dust-pan, until rescued and carried to Slowwe, where it now is. It is very remarkable that there is no trace or tradition of any ancient stone font, such as must have been in the church."

The font in the Church at Arlingham
The font which currently stands in the Church at Arlingham


[Why Friday Funny? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Site Updates - Surnames: Taysum/Taysom/Toysom, Longney, Mills, Watkins, Greenway, Goulding/Golding, Aylaway, Organ, Welch, Minton

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Hibbitt Family Tree section

I have recently been extending my Taysum/Taysom/Toysom line and have added a number of people and included further information for some of the existing people on my site as follows:

Place names: Arlingham, Minchinhampton, Drybrook, Frocester and Westbury on Severn, all in Gloucestershire.



[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Follow Friday: G-G-Grandmother's story is published in Discover Your History magazine

Category: Ancestors Corner

Discover Your History MagazineMy second article has been published in the October issue of the Discover Your History magazine and is now available in the shops. Alternatively, you can subscribe to the magazine or buy a single copy online.

This month's story, appearing on pages 36 and 37, is about my great-great-grandmother, Sarah Louisa Oliver. It tells the tale of Sarah's turbulent relationships, how she ran away to Australia and had a child by John George Waldegrave Barnes, a man she never married. She returned to England with just her child and took up with William Elbert Dando, my great-great-grandfather. After marrying William and having a son, the relationship quickly disintegrated, leading to some unpleasant goings-on including Sarah's arrest. William tried to divorce Sarah without success and eventually bigamously 'married' another woman.


[Why Follow Friday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Site Updates - Surnames: Dando, Oliver, Geake, Bishop, Gwyn, Hoskings, Jones

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Hibbitt Family Tree section

Place names: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, and London. Also, Merthyr Tydfil, Tonypandy and Ystradyfodwg in Glamorgan, and Sirhowy and Blackwood in Monmouthshire.



[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Workday Wednesday: My Weavers made shoes

Category: Ancestors Corner

FootwearHats and shoes feature significantly in my family. Whilst hats aren't quite so in vogue as they once were, we all still need footwear, but how things have changed!

My Dando line were the hatmakers, my first confirmed hatter being my 6 x great-grandfather, John Dando (abt. 1715-1775). However, this profession died out in my family during the mid-nineteenth century.

Moving from heads to feet, from the title of this post, you might be thinking my ancestors were involved in the weaving industry, having a sideline in making shoes. Actually, Weaver is the surname of my shoemaking forbears.

My 4 x great-grandfather, Robert Weaver (abt. 1789-1869), lived in Curry Rivel, Somerset, and was described as a shoe and boot maker and also a cordwainer. Distinct from a cobbler who repaired shoes, a cordwainer made luxury footwear out of the finest leathers. Whether Robert was the first cordwainer in his line is uncertain as I haven't been able to confirm the occupations of his antecedents.

My 2 x great-grandfather, William Henry Weaver (1848-1944), lived with Robert and his wife Sarah, and it is therefore no surprise that he too, went into the family trade. He would have learnt his skills from his grandfather. Ironically, there is in fact, a weaving link as William Henry's wife, Jane (nee Arnold), had previously been a silk weaver, coming from a long line of silk ribbon weavers in Nuneaton, Warwickshire.

Their son, Richard, had a short spell at shoemaking before embarking on a 40 year career with the post office. The need for homeworkers and factory outworkers met with a decline during the 19th century as factories increasingly took over the manufacturing processes and mechanisation in the industry was complete by the 1890's.

William Henry Weaver's granddaughter was my own gran, Phyllis Grace Geake (nee Weaver). Born in 1916, her connection with shoes was not in the making of them but in the selling. As a young woman she worked in a shoe shop called Leonards.

Footwear continues to play a large part today as our son, Phyllis' great-grandson, is the manager of a shoe store and so the connection with footwear, spanning at least eight generations of our family and four centuries, is still going strong.

Image provided by Classroom Clipart

[Why Workday Wednesday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Discover Your History magazine - out now!

Category: General

Discover Your History MagazineJust a reminder that the Discover Your History magazine is now available in all good newsagents or you can subscribe online here. Existing subcribers of Your Family History magazine will automatically receive Discover Your History from now on.

Henry James Weaver's story appears on pages 26 and 27.

Thankful Thursday: Those Elevenses Moments

Category: Sharing Memories

Coffee BreakWhen I was a girl, I would sometimes go to Tavistock in the school holidays to stay with my grandparents, William Hellyer Geake & Phyllis Grace Geake (nee Weaver). Grandpa would often be at work so I'd be at home with gran.

One of the highlights of the day was Elevenses. Mid-morning, gran would stop whatever she was doing and sit down with me with a cup of coffee and I'd have a cocoa or some other hot drink. A biscuit or two and a game of cards would often crop up too.

It wasn't for the refreshments that Elevenses was so special (nice as they were) but this was my time with my gran and that was what made it so special.

[Why Thankful Thursday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Site Updates - Surnames: Feaston, Tyeth, Clarke, Oliver

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Hibbitt Family Tree section

Place names: Launceston in Cornwall, Upton Park and Kilburn in London.



[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Military Monday: Great-grandfather's wartime story is published

Category: Sharing Memories

Exciting news! I was recently invited to write a few articles about my family history research for the Discover Your History magazine, a brand new publication due to be launched on 5th September. Published each month, the magazine will focus on family and social history and all aspects of heritage.

My first article is appearing in the first issue and tells the story of my great-grandfather, Henry James Weaver, who was accidentally killed during the First World War.

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