Family Recipe Friday: Kitchen Maxims from Mrs Beeton's

Category: Mrs Beeton's Cookery Books

It's been a while since I published an excerpt from my gran's 1894 publication of 'Mrs Beeton's Cookery Book and Household Guide' so here goes:

Kitchen Maxims

Kitchen Maxims


I think the funniest phrase is "One egg well beaten is worth two not beaten".

For more information about the book, please see this post.

[Why Family Recipe Friday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

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Wishful Wednesday: Great-aunt Cissie poses for Newlyn School artist

Category: Famous Connections

Cissie Barnes, aged 17Harvey's great-aunt, Cissie Barnes, sounds like 'quite a gal'. She posed for Newlyn School artist, Dod Procter, for the picture, 'Morning', which caused a bit of a stir at the time. Cissie (real-name - Sarah) was just 16 years old when she modelled for the painting, which shows her reclining on her bed having a morning snooze.

Painted in 1926, the picture was voted Picture of the Year at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition of 1927 and was bought for the nation by the Daily Mail newspaper. It was also displayed in New York, went on tour for 2 years and became part of the Tate collection. The painting now hangs in the Tate Modern Gallery in London.

Cissie was born, and grew up, in Newlyn, Cornwall, and it's understood that Dod Procter painted her several times. I can only imagine Cissie might have enjoyed some short-term notoriety when the picture hit the headlines. Amongst the family archive is a newspaper cutting which shows a photograph of Cissie standing in one of her father's fishing vessels wearing a sou'wester hat, waterproof coat and boots. It was taken when she was 17 years old and the caption refers to Dod Procter's painting.

It's with some regret that Harvey never met, or even knew about, his great-aunt Cissie, especially as it appears she was still alive when Harvey was growing up. Even more ironic is that she resided in Plymouth in her latter years, which would have coincided with some of the years Harvey spent living in the same city.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Site Updates - Surnames: Barnes, Gardner

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Barnes Family Tree section

Place names: Newlyn in Cornwall and Plymouth in Devon.

Barnes Family Biographies section

Added a biography page about Cissie Barnes in the new Barnes family biographies section.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Site Updates - Elizabeth Gale (later Hellier)

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Hibbitt Family Tree section

  • Added further details and notes for my 4 x great-grandmother, Elizabeth Gale.
So what have I discovered so far?

Elizabeth Gale was married to Samuel Hellier in Tavistock in 1815. She was most likely widowed before 1841 as she appears on the census with her grand-daughter, Sarah Hellier, and a Grace Gale, who was probably a relative but I've yet to discover who Grace was. Residing in West Street in 1841, Elizabeth and her grand-daughter lived at Ford Street Alms House in 1851 and 1861.

Elizabeth lived to be about 78 years old and was still working as a laundress 3 years before she died. She was probably born in Widecombe-in-the-Moor as stated on the 1851 census, although the 1861 census puts Tavistock as her birth place. This might easily have been an error - whoever gave the enumerator the information might have guessed or said 'Don't know' so perhaps Tavistock was chosen because this was where the family were living at the time.

I need to undertake further research to discover Elizabeth's roots but, as I don't currently have access to baptism registers for Widecombe, this will be placed on hold for the time-being.

Place names: Tavistock and Widecombe-in-the-Moor in the county of Devon.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Sentimental Sunday: Messing about on the Water

Category: Sharing Memories

My Grandpa Hibbitt (Charles George Hibbitt) used to have a boat, a small cabin cruiser, and we spent many hours as a family on the Kingsbridge/Salcombe Estuary. He kept the boat at Frogmore Creek, a short drive from his and Gran's home in the South Hams village of East Allington.

Frogmore in 2010
Frogmore in 2010

They say the sense of smell is the most nostalgic of the senses. Every spring when the new season arrives there's a certain smell in the air and it always reminds me of our days out in the boat. Mind you, the smell of two-stroke does the same thing.

Grandpa on his boat
Grandpa on his boat

Grandpa had two rowing boats but one leaked so we never used it. The other one would accompany us on our day trip, being towed by the cruiser. The rowing boats were named after my elder brother and I (my younger brother probably wasn't born when the names were first used). It sounds stupid now but I remember being miffed that the leaky boat was the one named after me......Read more »

Site Updates - Surnames: Hellyer/Hellier, Congdon, Sillick

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Upon researching my 2 x great-grandparents, John Gale Hellier & Mary Ann Congdon, I've discovered more about their children.

After one of their twins, May Amelia Hellyer, died under the age of 2, they also lost another daughter, Alice Maud, at 10 months old. A second son (and 10th child), John, was born in April 1890, just a few months before his mother died.

John senior found himself widowed with 8 children whose ages ranged from 12 years to 4 months. It's not surprising that by the following year (1891) two of his daughters, Lily Elizabeth and Sarah May (my great-grandmother), were living with extended family members. The young boy, John, was adopted by Thomas Simpson (a naval pensioner and perhaps a friend of John's father) and his wife, Mary. Sadly, the boy died at the age of 9 years.

Hibbitt Family Tree section

Place names: Tavistock and also Devonport in Plymouth, both in the county of Devon.

Resources > Hibbitt Family Tree Biographies section

Amended the biography page for John Gale Hellier.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Sentimental Sunday: Postman Spoils Special Homecoming

Category: Sharing Memories

I remember my gran (Phyllis Grace Geake, nee Weaver) once telling me what happened the day my grandpa (William Hellyer Geake) arrived home from the second world war, having been away for four years.

It was fairly early in the morning when grandpa got home and his arrival coincided with that of the postman (or it might have been the milkman but I think it was the former). The postman knew grandpa and proceeded to ask him all about his time away in the war and stood at the doorstep chatting for 5 or 10 minutes. How insensitive! All the while, gran was waiting to greet the husband she hadn't seen for such a long time. In addition to this, he'd never even met his 4 year old daughter, who was more than a little coy at the sight of this strange man in their house! Gran said the postman ruined their reunion.

My Grandpa's WWII Service Record
My Grandpa's WWII Service Record

[Why Sentimental Sunday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Site Updates - Surnames: Geake, Dinner, Arscott, Pengelly, Walters, Dearing, Ball, Edwards, Sillick, Hellier, Gale, Hibbitt, Pitcher, Newbold, Day

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

With my new FindMyPast.co.uk subscription, I've been delving into my maternal family, taking advantage of the many Devon records in their databases.

Hibbitt Family Tree section

The Church at Peter Tavy
The Church at Peter Tavy

Place names: Milton Abbot, Marystow, Peter Tavy, Wapsworthy, Cudlipptown, Mary Tavy, Tavistock, Okehampton, Hatherleigh - all in Devon; plus Birmingham and Ireland.

Resources > Family Tree Reports section

Updated the report for the 'Ancestors of William Hellyer Geake'.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Site Updates - Surnames: Hibbitt, Pitcher, Young, Gardner, Applegate, Holt, Ellen, Byden

Category: What's New at Hibbitt.org.uk

Hibbitt Family Tree section

Place names: Ladywood in Birmingham; Uley, Coaley and Rockhampton in Gloucestershire; Bath, Northwick and Keynsham in Somerset.

Barnes Family Tree section

Place names: St Saviour, Southwark in Surrey; Islington and Holloway in London; Bedford in Bedfordshire; Manchester; Edmonton and Muswell Hill in Middlesex; Penzance in Cornwall; Reading in Berkshire; Seaham Harbour in Durham.

Resources > Hibbitt Family Tree Biographies section

Added biography page for Benjamin Pitcher (abt. 1775-1857) .

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Surname Saturday: Doing the Deed!

Category: Making Memories

The Deed is done! What Deed...I hear you say. The Deed Poll, that's what!

No this isn't a riddle or a joke and it's not a hypothetical either. For some time now, I've been considering incorporating my maiden name back into my name. My interest in family history, together with a strong desire to identify with my heritage, has spurred this decision on. So I ordered a pack from UK Deed Poll Service - and now I'm officially called Anne Mary Hibbitt BARNES.

I'm an advocate for the institution of marriage and have no desire to have a different surname to my husband so Hibbitt is now my second middle name, although it was my surname at birth. For any married women out there who don't want to completely abandon their maiden name, a Deed Poll is an excellent way of keeping hold of it.

As to my Christian name, although informally I like to be known as Annie (and I shall continue in this vein), I decided that I should still formally be known as Anne. This is, and always has been, my proper name (given to me at birth and the one I was baptized with) and therefore, I don't think I should want to change it now. In effect, all I have done is put back what was mine in the first instance, not altering or adding to it.

Of course, most people won't notice anything different but I will know and that's important to me. From now on, I can put Hibbitt on official forms. I've yet to complete the task of changing all my official documents - for some this could be laborious and is what has made me hesitate until now. However, getting ones documents changed is part of the point of it, as well as being a legal requirement, so I've finally bitten the bullet and gone for it.

Once more, I have that connection with my blood line reflected in my name. Who knows, maybe a descendant will stumble across my headstone in 200 years time, or discover me in the paper trail (or digital footprint), see the name and make that connection too!

[Why Surname Saturday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]
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