Archive for October 2013

Friday Funny: Church font doubles as a dust-pan

Category: Ancestors Corner

Today's amusing anecdote is attributed to Aaron Taysum (abt. 1780-1851) who was the parish clerk in Arlingham, Gloucestershire, taking over the role from his father after he died in 1807.

In 1886, John Sayer, the son of a former vicar of Arlingham, published his writings which were again republished in 2008 in a book called 'Antiquities of Arlingham'. Apparently Aaron Taysum utilized a metal basin as a dust-pan. The following excerpt reveals how this basin had previously been used as a font

"The font, as all parishioners know, is of modern work; the elder ones will remember that before this font was placed in the church the wooden structure now adapted as an alms box, and which was provided with a silver basin, was given for this purpose by Lady Mill, then living at the Court, and the representative of the Yate family, and superseded an ancient pewter or metal basin, which had been doing duty for a font, and which subsequently the writer recollects, was used by the clerk, Aaron Taysum, for a dust-pan, until rescued and carried to Slowwe, where it now is. It is very remarkable that there is no trace or tradition of any ancient stone font, such as must have been in the church."

The font in the Church at Arlingham
The font which currently stands in the Church at Arlingham


[Why Friday Funny? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Follow Friday: G-G-Grandmother's story is published in Discover Your History magazine

Category: Ancestors Corner

Discover Your History MagazineMy second article has been published in the October issue of the Discover Your History magazine and is now available in the shops. Alternatively, you can subscribe to the magazine or buy a single copy online.

This month's story, appearing on pages 36 and 37, is about my great-great-grandmother, Sarah Louisa Oliver. It tells the tale of Sarah's turbulent relationships, how she ran away to Australia and had a child by John George Waldegrave Barnes, a man she never married. She returned to England with just her child and took up with William Elbert Dando, my great-great-grandfather. After marrying William and having a son, the relationship quickly disintegrated, leading to some unpleasant goings-on including Sarah's arrest. William tried to divorce Sarah without success and eventually bigamously 'married' another woman.


[Why Follow Friday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]