Category: Making Memories

Sentimental Sunday: We Will Remember Them

Category: Making Memories

Remembrance Sunday Service at Tavistock 2016
Remembrance Sunday Service at Tavistock 2016

Remembrance Sunday Service at Tavistock 2016
Remembrance Sunday Service at Tavistock 2016

Tavistock War Memorial
Tavistock War Memorial

Memorial Cross dedicated to Henry James Weaver
Memorial Cross dedicated to Henry James Weaver

Click the images above to see a larger version.

Harvey and I went to Tavistock today for the Remembrance Sunday Service. My great-grandfather, 4732 Pte. Henry James Weaver, is commemorated on the War Memorial there and, as it is the centenary year of the anniversary of his death, I thought it was fitting that we should be there today.

Tavistock War Memorial - 13th November 2016
Tavistock War Memorial - 13th November 2016

Keywords: Tavistock, Devon.

[Why Sentimental Sunday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Voice from Outer Space

Category: Making Memories

A couple of weeks ago my dad, who's been a radio ham for 50 years, heard a radio contact between the British astronaut, Tim Peake, and a school in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire. He had to dig out his 2 metres rig which he hadn't used for ages - a small handheld receiver with a rubber duck antenna. Not having a decent aerial, he was amazed that it worked. It was the first transmission he'd heard from outer space.

Today I visited dad and listened out for another ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) contact from the ISS, this time with the City of Norwich Schools. We heard Tim Peake from here in Plymouth and I recorded it on a dictaphone and then edited it in Windows Movie Maker using screenshots from the live webcast and a photograph of dad's radio set.


This video can also be viewed on my YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/S-FYxga-0f4

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Photograph by Harvey's Grandad to feature on German TV almost a century after it was taken

Category: Making Memories

Last year I posted in the Great War Forum a number of photographs which were taken by Harvey's grandad during World War I. I wanted to see if any of the forum members could identify the places and indeed they were extremely helpful.

Amongst Cyril Ellen's collection was a series of photographs of the Lower Struma in Greece, believed to have been taken by him when he was an Observer Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Air Service, based at nearby Stavros. At the time, the River Struma formed the Front Line between the Allied and Central Powers.

Series of Photographs of the Lower Struma, September 1917
Series of Photographs of the Lower Struma, September 1917
(Click the image above to view a larger version.)

Six pictures were glued onto some paper to form a panorama and, at one end, a village called Kato Krusoves/Krusovo is to be seen overlooking the river. This area is now known as Kato Kerdylia because the village was destroyed by the Germans in 1941 and the male population was massacred. Only the church was rebuilt, and the original bell tower still stands as a memorial to the 230 dead of Ano and Kato Kerdylia. A forum member informed me that photographs of the village before its destruction are rare and that the picture could be of historical interest.

Zoom of the village of Kato Krusoves during the First World War
Zoom of the village of Kato Krusoves during the First World War
(Click the image above to view a larger version.)

This brings me on to an unusual request which came via my family history website last week. A German television network called Westdeutscher Rundfunk Köln or WDR (West German Broadcasting Cologne) got in touch and asked for permission to use Cyril's photo of the village in a major documentary about the atrocities committed by German forces during the Greek occupation in World War II.

Eager to find out more, I wrote back and learnt that the purpose of the documentary is to educate the German public about the atrocities in this partly forgotten aspect of the war. The background to this is the recent controversy over Greek demands for compensation relating to the time of the occupation, amounting to billions of Euros, and the programme will serve to inform people of the facts.

The TV crew visited Kerdylia a few months ago and went up to the former village, together with one of the few survivors of the massacre, the village being the first of more than 1000 completely destroyed with thousands of innocent people killed in the action to take revenge for partisan attacks.

Cyril's photographs were originally taken in 1917 when they were used together with a trench map and lists of enemy positions. The map can be viewed here and the observation post, from where the picture was taken, is clearly marked as a blue dot in Sector 47 H. More on the photographs can be seen here.

The programme, called Schuld und Schulden (Guilt and Debt), is due to be broadcast on 27th April 2016 and I understand it will also be available to watch online. As I don't speak German, I doubt I shall know what is being said which is a pity as it sounds like an interesting documentary.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Travel Tuesday: Tiger Moth at Imperial War Museum Duxford

Category: Making Memories

As the Imperial War Museum Duxford is being featured on the BBC programme, The People Remember, all this week I thought I'd post a video of a de Havilland Tiger Moth which came in to land at Duxford when we were there in the summer.

A similar aircraft was featured on today's show when former 'Spitfire Girl' Joy Lofthouse reminisced about her service delivering fighter planes to the frontline and flew in a Tiger Moth at the age of 92, briefly taking the controls whilst in the air.

According to Harvey's grandad's surviving log book from the 1930's onwards, Cyril Ellen also flew in moths, primarily as a practice aircraft.



This video can also be viewed on my YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/UE0jQaENsW8

[Why Travel Tuesday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Those Places Thursday: Cleaning family graves in Cornwall

Category: Making Memories

We like to visit Newlyn in Cornwall from time to time, the home of Harvey's forbears as well as the place where he lived as a young child, so last weekend we took a drive down. We brought along a bucket, a scrubbing brush and cleaner together with some shears to the cemetery in Sheffield Road on the outskirts of the nearby village of Paul where a number of Harvey's relatives are buried. The cemetery is always well kept but it's nice to be able to tidy things up just a little bit more.

After we'd tended Harvey's parents grave, we moved over to that of his great-grandparents (Thomas Barnes & Sarah Elizabeth, nee Wright) and his grandad (also Thomas Barnes). The monument had become quite dirty in recent years and a few stumps of grass had decided to poke through the side of the covering stone so it was with great satisfaction that we removed the grass and cleaned up the headstone.

Grave of Thomas Barnes senr., his wife, Sarah nee Wright, and their son, Thomas Barnes jun. before the clean-up
Grave of Thomas Barnes senr., his wife, Sarah nee Wright,
and their son, Thomas Barnes jun. before the clean-up.


Grave of Thomas Barnes senr., his wife, Sarah nee Wright, and their son, Thomas Barnes jun. after the clean-up
Grave of Thomas Barnes senr., his wife, Sarah nee Wright,
and their son, Thomas Barnes jun. after the clean-up.

Amongst the family archive, we have the somewhat dilapidated, stone mason's original invoice which describes the monument in detail. The firm was W. H. Snell who were based in Newlyn. Sarah died in October 1910 but the invoice is dated almost two years later on 27th July 1912. It states…

For making Polished Granite fronted Headstone and Polished fronted Base of fine Grit Cornish Granite with Scotch Granite Green pearl Urn, and Red Suede Pillars all polished, and Lead Inscription Gilded over front of Letters and fine dressed Granite Kerb around Grave Galvanized Iron Tomb Rail 871 Pattern and Slate Covering Stone over Grave Space fixed at the Cemetery Paul as per price agreed. £25 0s 0d. (equivalent to more than £2000 today). Written below this are further costs which have since faded and become illegible.

When Thomas Barnes senr. died in 1939, the cost to remove the monument for burial, to add further lettering and clean and re-erect it with new foundations came to £6 7s. 0d. The invoice was produced by Snell & Son with the slogan… When outstanding Quality is essential discriminating buyers favour "SNELLS". We have no paperwork denoting the costs for when Thomas Barnes jun. was buried in 1975.

Finally, it wasn't until we arrived home and looked at the photographs I'd taken that we realized we'd paid a visit on the anniversary of Harvey's great-grandfather's death - 10th October.

Thomas Barnes senr's. headstone inscription
Thomas Barnes senr's. headstone inscription.


[Why Those Places Thursday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

Visiting my gran's birthplace of Saffron Walden in Essex

Category: Making Memories

When we visited the market town of Saffron Walden in Essex in the summer, I just had to take the photograph on the right because it reminded me of a postcard (seen on the left) which most likely belonged to my Granny Hibbitt (Ivy Alice Hibbitt, nee Dando) and which is now in my possession.

St Mary's Church, Saffron Walden, Essex
St Mary's Church, Saffron Walden, Essex
(Click the image above to see a larger version.)

My gran was born in Saffron Walden in 1904 and was baptized in St Mary's Church on 23rd October of that year. By the time of the 1911 census, the family had moved to Plymouth but I can't be certain exactly when they arrived.

Gran had an affinity with Saffron Walden and when she and my Grandpa settled in Tavistock, they called the name of their bungalow in Chollacott Close, Walden, although now it has a number. I know that they visited Saffron Walden at least once (and probably many more times) because I have a cine film of them in the town.

It was nice to finally see the sweet shop where my gran was born. The Golden Butterfly at 2 Market Street was a sweet and tobacconist shop then and still is to this day. I bought a bag of sherbet lemons so I could have a peek inside.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Sentimental Sunday: My visit to the charming village of Curry Rivel in Somerset

Category: Making Memories

Whilst away recently on a short break, hubby and I took the opportunity to stop off at the quaint village of Curry Rivel on our return journey. Tucked away in the Somerset countryside, the village features a church, parts of which date back to the Norman period, a village green and some lovely character properties.

St Andrew's Church, Curry Rivel
St Andrew's Church, Curry Rivel

Curry Rivel was the home of my Weaver family for centuries; my 6 x great-grandparents married in St Andrew's Church on 5th August 1745 and there is evidence of numerous generations of Weavers living there before them. I've been reluctant to include these generations in my tree without further documentation but I may revisit this again some time in the future and take a view.

Whilst I explored the churchyard I happened upon three Weaver headstones, one of which belonged to my 4 x great-grandparents, Robert Weaver and his wife, Sarah nee Street. Robert and Sarah were 80 and 82 years old respectively when they passed away.

The headstone of Robert Weaver and his wife, Sarah nee Street
The headstone of Robert Weaver and his wife, Sarah nee Street

Inside the church, on the War Memorial board I saw the name of my great-grandfather, Henry James Weaver. Someone had taken the trouble to compile a folder entitled, "Men of Curry Rivel Who Died in the Great War 1914-1918". Killed in September 1916, Henry had stood or knelt at the altar of this same church only nine months earlier when he'd married his bride, Florence Smale.

The altar inside St Andrew's Church, Curry Rivel
The altar inside St Andrew's Church, Curry Rivel

I wrote in the visitor's book and, at the last minute, I went back and added my email address. By a strange co-incidence, three days later, I received an email from the great-grand-daughter of one of Henry's sisters who had just visited the church and had seen my message.

A committee, formed in 1919, decided the main village War Memorial should be situated "on the roadside, on the King's highway, so that not only the inhabitants of this district could see it, but also all those who passed by on that road ..." Henry is remembered on this memorial which was dedicated at a moving service attended by the whole village on 7th November 1920. I have no idea if there were any representatives from the Smale side of the family (his widow and child lived in Tavistock in West Devon) but I would imagine Henry's parents, and perhaps some of his siblings, would have been present.

The War Memorial at Curry Rivel
The War Memorial at Curry Rivel

My gran (Henry and Florence's daughter), lost touch with her father's side of the family after she was orphaned when she was quite small. Later, in 1939, she travelled to Curry Rivel from her home in Tavistock with my mum who was then a baby, to see if she could find family. She asked someone whether there were any Weavers still in the village and was directed to the home of her Uncle Dick (Richard Arthur Weaver) and his wife, Alice. I believe Dick wasn't there at the time but to my gran's amazement, the person who came to the door was her 91 year old grandfather, William Henry Weaver (1848-1944). They were both thrilled - my gran hadn't known the old man was still alive.

If you enjoyed reading this post, you may like to take a moment to view the short video I took during my brief visit.

[Why Sentimental Sunday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Daily Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Visiting Westminster College, Cambridge

Category: Making Memories

Last week, Harvey and I took a short break, spending time in the Cambridgeshire/Essex/Bedfordshire/Hertfordshire area. Whilst we were there, we visited Westminster College in Cambridge, a centre for learning within the United Reformed Church, which also houses several sets of archives:
  • The records of Cheshunt College (including correspondence with the Countess of Huntingdon).
  • The Presbyterian Church of England archive.
  • The United Reformed Church History Society collection.
  • The records of Westminster College.
  • The Churches of Christ archive.

Westminster College
Westminster College, Cambridge

I've mentioned before how my 6 x great-grandfather, John Dando the elder, wrote to the Countess of Huntingdon in 1771, having first been introduced by letter by Rev'd Rowland Hill, an itinerant preacher with whom John was acquainted.

Rev'd Hill wrote…

"According to your Ladysps orders I have spoken to a Hatter who has sent his terms in Letter By Mr. Hawksworth. I shall also this evening speak to a clothier who shall also write you his terms. as I believe them both to be real Xtians I hope there is no reason to doubt but you will have Xtian treatment from ym both."

Letter written by Rowland Hill

Letter written by Rowland Hill
Letter written by Rev'd Rowland Hill to the Countess of Huntingdon
(Click the images above to see larger versions.)

In his letter, John informed the Countess of the price of his hats and went on to discuss the evangelical revival taking place in his area. This would, no doubt, have been of interest to the Countess who had founded the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, a Calvinistic movement within the Methodist Church.

Letter written by John Dando

Letter written by John Dando
Letter written by John Dando to the Countess of Huntingdon
(Click the images above to see larger versions.)

It was great to see the original letter in person and I would like to mention the wonderful enthusiasm of Helen, the archivist at the College.

The Lodge at Westminster College
The Lodge at Westminster College, Cambridge

Westminster College is a lovely Grade II listed building with some beautiful architecture and I especially liked the library and the Chapel. Had I known in advance that they offer accommodation, I think I'd have been tempted to stay for a couple of days!

Letters reproduced here with the permission of the Trustees of the Cheshunt Foundation, Westminster College, Cambridge.
Rev'd Rowland Hill Letter Reference: (F1/1200)
John Dando Letter Reference: (F1/141)


[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

The Partial Solar Eclipse

Category: Making Memories

Partial Solar Eclipse  Partial Solar Eclipse

Click the images above to see a larger version.

For the 'Making Memories' category, here are a couple of images of the partial solar eclipse which I took last week (Friday 20th March 2015) from the back garden. Quite a spectacle!

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Surname Saturday: Doing the Deed!

Category: Making Memories

The Deed is done! What Deed...I hear you say. The Deed Poll, that's what!

No this isn't a riddle or a joke and it's not a hypothetical either. For some time now, I've been considering incorporating my maiden name back into my name. My interest in family history, together with a strong desire to identify with my heritage, has spurred this decision on. So I ordered a pack from UK Deed Poll Service - and now I'm officially called Anne Mary Hibbitt BARNES.

I'm an advocate for the institution of marriage and have no desire to have a different surname to my husband so Hibbitt is now my second middle name, although it was my surname at birth. For any married women out there who don't want to completely abandon their maiden name, a Deed Poll is an excellent way of keeping hold of it.

As to my Christian name, although informally I like to be known as Annie (and I shall continue in this vein), I decided that I should still formally be known as Anne. This is, and always has been, my proper name (given to me at birth and the one I was baptized with) and therefore, I don't think I should want to change it now. In effect, all I have done is put back what was mine in the first instance, not altering or adding to it.

Of course, most people won't notice anything different but I will know and that's important to me. From now on, I can put Hibbitt on official forms. I've yet to complete the task of changing all my official documents - for some this could be laborious and is what has made me hesitate until now. However, getting ones documents changed is part of the point of it, as well as being a legal requirement, so I've finally bitten the bullet and gone for it.

Once more, I have that connection with my blood line reflected in my name. Who knows, maybe a descendant will stumble across my headstone in 200 years time, or discover me in the paper trail (or digital footprint), see the name and make that connection too!

[Why Surname Saturday? This phrase has been included in the title in order to take part in Blogging Prompts at Geneabloggers]

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]
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