Category: DNA

Update on the Hibbitt/Hibbett/Hibbit Y-DNA Haplogroup

Category: DNA

Following on from a previous post where I explained that my patrilineal line doesn't match the Hibbitt haplogroup, I am now giving an update for those called Hibbitt or a variant of the name.

We now have four people called either Hibbitt, Hibbett or Hibbit sharing the Z2534 haplogroup. At least two descend from John Hybot and Ann Tubbs who married in Exton, Rutland, in 1732, through their son, Matthew, who married Frances Penruddock. A third person could either descend from Matthew and Frances or Matthew's brother, William, who married Elizabeth Skillet. Either way, John Hybot and Ann Tubbs would be this person's forebears too.

The final Z2534 result came from a descendant of a John Hibbit who married Mary Toft in London in 1770. This then, would point to a connection back to either John Hybot or, quite probably, an ancestor of his, how far back we cannot know without specific Y-DNA testing.

Three of the results were obtained when testers ran their AncestryDNA raw data files through the Morley Y-SNP Subclade Predictor Tool at https://ytree.morleydna.com/extractFromAutosomal

The fourth person in this Z2534 group tested with Living DNA which gave a more recent haplogroup than Z2534. The haplogroup was Z2189. The R Z2534 DNA project suggests that the people they have in their project who are positive for the Z2189 SNP have Iberian ancestry.

The Ancestry and Living DNA tests are not dedicated Y DNA tests, instead they are autosomal DNA tests with a small amount of Y-DNA data included. The YTree at YFull shows various testers who've taken the Big Y test at FTDNA or similar and who come under Z2534: https://www.yfull.com/tree/R-Z2534/. The ancestry of those in the Z2189 group includes places such as Spain, Portugal, Mexico and Puerto Rico. It's curious then, how the Hybot family came to be in England but it needs to be noted that the Z2189 haplogroup was formed about 4000 years ago.

The R Z2189 Haplogroup on the YTree
The R Z2189 Haplogroup on the YTree

If anyone in the Hibbitt etc. group was to take a Big Y test and upload to YFull, it would be interesting to see whether they were a match to any of the existing subclades of Z2189 or whether they would eventually form a brand new branch if a closer DNA match also tested.

As for my line, with every result that comes in at Z2534, it confirms that I am not a 'real' Hibbitt after all. My Dad's haplogroup is Z36747 which separated from the Z2534 haplogroup at DF13, which is a couple of clades above Z2534, and therefore further back in time. I still have no idea what my maiden name should have been but I believe that it's either my great-grandfather or his father who had a father who wasn't a Hibbitt. This is contrary to what the records say so no clues so far.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

DNA highlights my Grandpa Geake's mysterious Irish connections

Category: DNA

Ancestry has recently completed its Irish ethnicity regions update and now offers 92 distinct regions in Ireland. This has resulted in my being able to identify some areas on my maternal grandfather's side. My mum, aunt and two of their first cousins have tested at Ancestry and here are the findings.

My Mum's Irish Ethnicity Results
My Mum's Irish Ethnicity Results


My Aunt's Irish Ethnicity Results
My Aunt's Irish Ethnicity Results


Cousin 1's Irish Ethnicity Results
Cousin 1's Irish Ethnicity Results


Cousin 2's Irish Ethnicity Results
Cousin 2's Irish Ethnicity Results
Note: The Scottish connection is because Cousin 2's mother was Scottish


Here are maps of the regions:

Connacht with sub-regions of North East Mayo & North West Sligo, North Connacht and North Mayo
Connacht with sub-regions of North East Mayo & North West Sligo, North Connacht and North Mayo


Central Ireland with sub-regions of North Leinster & East Connacht and North Leitrim & East Sligo
Central Ireland with sub-regions of North Leinster & East Connacht and North Leitrim & East Sligo


The region known as North East Mayo & North West Sligo shows up in all of the cousins' results and yet I cannot trace an ancestor from this region. The only Irish connection I have is currently tenuous - one of the cousins' shared great-grandmothers married their great-grandfather in Shanagolden, Limerick, in 1871. Her maiden name might have been Burgoyne or Congdon and I cannot be certain that she was definitely Irish. Her husband, John Gale Hellier, was in the Royal Navy and was from Tavistock in Devon - www.hibbitt.org.uk/familytree/fam1847.html.

It's remarkable that such a lot of Irish DNA has filtered down through the generations considering the three other shared great-grandparents were all Devonians and having only Devon ancestry going further back in time. The cousins' other known family lines do not involve Ireland and so it cannot be easily explained.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Obtaining your Deceased Ancestor's DNA could soon become a reality

Category: DNA

Postcard written in 1909 by my great-grandmother, Florence Smale
Postcard written in 1909 by my great-grandmother, Florence Smale, to her sister's sister-in-law, Edith Browning, nee Martin

EXTRACTING GENEALOGICAL DNA FROM ENVELOPES AND STAMPS

A few months ago Living DNA announced they had successfully extracted DNA from a stamp on an old envelope which enabled a person who was abandoned as a baby to identify her father.

Although we haven't heard any more from Living DNA about when this may become generally available, there is a company in Australia which is now offering a similar service called totheletter DNA - www.totheletterdna.com

MyHeritage also recently announced...

"MyHeritage will soon be able, through a partnership with a specialist company, to process the DNA from stamps and old envelopes and then link the DNA to the ancestor, providing you with DNA results for your deceased ancestors, right on MyHeritage."

It remains to be seen if their partner is totheletter DNA.

CONSIDERATIONS TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT

The totheletter DNA service is expensive ($781.50 AUD, approximately £445 for each artifact). If enough DNA is not available after the extraction process has taken place, a large proportion of the fee is refundable: https://www.totheletterdna.com/buy/find-dna.

However, cost and the possibility of the lack of a useable sample aren't the only factors to take into consideration. Here are some other things to think about...
  • Currently the DNA raw data file can only be uploaded to GEDmatch Genesis for comparison with others who have tested their DNA. This may well change in the future if artifact testing becomes more popular.

  • So far, the service is limited to items which would have been licked such as envelopes with the seal intact and stamps.

  • The DNA might not belong to the person you expect. The sender of the letter may have asked the post master or a friend to lick the item.

  • There may be no DNA on the item if a sponge was used to wet the stamp or envelope.

  • The envelope or stamp you send in cannot be used a second time so you may want to wait a while to see how the technology develops before submitting that one and only postcard you have which your great-grandmother sent to her friend.

  • Scan your item before sending it as it won't be returned to you in the same condition.

IDENTIFY AND PRESERVE YOUR ARTIFACTS NOW

There are potentially exciting times ahead. If the cost reduces in the future and the technology proves successful then we need to be identifying and preserving our artifacts right now.

Denise May Levenick, aka The Family Curator, makes the following recommendations on her blog (https://thefamilycurator.com/how-to-preserve-and-test-old-letters-for-grandmas-dna/)...
  • Identify potential items for DNA testing and isolate from other items. Wear white cotton or nitrile gloves to avoid further contamination.

  • Place the individual item in an acid-free paper folder or envelope. Avoid plastic.

  • If possible, store this envelope inside an archival box or a metal file drawer to further protect from handling and temperature fluctuations. This location should be inside your home where temperature and humidity doesn't change dramatically. Keep dry.

Avoid
  • Handling and cross-contamination.

  • Freezing.

  • Moisture.

  • Heat.

TIP: If you don't have an archival folder or envelope, sandwich the letter and envelope between two sheets of acid-free resume paper (available at most office-supply stores). Place everything in a standard file folder or large envelope and store as directed above.

I DON'T HAVE ANY ARTIFACTS SUITABLE FOR TESTING, WHAT NOW?

You may not think you have any viable items from your ancestors but it's worth getting in touch with your known relatives to see whether they are sitting on a letter or postcard written by your mutual great-grandfather. The DNA of a full sibling of your direct ancestor is equally as useful as that of your own direct relative as their parents would still be your direct ancestors.

If you know of anyone to whom your ancestor may have written, then you might try to contact their living relatives to see whether they have any correspondence from your ancestor.

Another strategy is to look up family trees online to see whether you can identify descendants of a mutual ancestor. It may be that they have a suitable artifact they'd be willing to have tested. You might also consider sharing the cost between interested relatives who would benefit from the extracted DNA.

IF YOU CAN HELP, PLEASE CONTACT ME

If you're reading this and you are in possession of an item which may be suitable for genealogical DNA testing and which may have been sent by one of my (and perhaps your) relatives, please preserve the item as best you can and do get in touch with me. I have no immediate plans to test at the current prices but it might be something to look into in the future.

If nothing else, it's always interesting to discover personal family items which you didn't know existed so I'd like to take this opportunity to say if you have any correspondence, documents, photographs or objects connected to my family, I'd love to see (and, if possible, scan or photograph) them so please do contact me. It doesn't matter if they can't be used for DNA extraction, it all adds to the story of the family and that's a good enough reason in itself.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

DNA uncovers a family secret

Category: DNA

A new DNA match recently appeared in our match lists (I'll call her Sally - not her real name) which revealed something about my maternal grandmother's uncle that I feel sure my gran never knew about. Richard Arthur Weaver, brother of my great-grandfather, Henry James Weaver, had an illegitimate child before he was married.

I've said before how my gran lost touch with her father's family having been orphaned at the age of four so it's not surprising that my gran probably wouldn't have known this. See my previous blog post at http://www.hibbitt.org.uk/blog/item/463 which mentions how my gran visited the family many years later.

At first, it wasn't obvious how Sally and I were related and so I set about reviewing the evidence and eliminating suspects. Sally is my third cousin and a second cousin once removed to my mum and aunt. Richard Weaver was her great-grandfather and so we share common ancestors in our 2 x great-grandparents, William Henry Weaver and Jane (nee Arnold).

This is how I worked out the relationship. Sally shares 120 centimorgans across 7 segments of DNA with my mum. I used the calculator at https://dnapainter.com/tools/sharedcmv4 which confirmed my suspicions that the match had to be reasonably close. Most of these segments even passed down to my brother, one generation below.

Sally's grandmother, Laura, was born in July 1901 and I managed to find Laura's baptism which included Weaver as a middle name. Her full name was Laura Bessie May Weaver PAYNE. My gran's maiden name was Weaver so this immediately gave me a clue as to which side of my family I needed to concentrate on. I had already drawn the conclusion that the connection was likely to be on my mum's maternal side because two paternal first cousins of my mum and aunt have taken a DNA test and neither of them are a match to Sally.

I began looking for likely candidates as to who might have fathered Laura. I felt that our 2 x great-grandfather, William Henry Weaver, was a little too far out of range for the amount of shared DNA, and probably too old for a young girl to be interested in him (although not impossible of course). This left my great-grandfather, Henry, and his older brother, Richard, in the frame. If it was Henry, who was 18 when Laura was born, then Sally would be my mum's half first cousin once removed. The DNA match falls within range but is less likely than if it was Richard who was 26 when Laura was born. In this scenario, Sally would be my mum's second cousin once removed and this was more of a comfortable fit, DNA-wise.

These were pointers rather than definite conclusions because DNA inheritance is random and there is quite a bit of overlap in the amount of DNA someone can share with a cousin. I had to find something to tie Richard to Lily Payne, the mother of Laura, so I looked up the newspapers on FindMyPast and, lo and behold, this is what I found.

28th September 1901 in the Chard and Ilminster News...

CASE ADJOURNED. - Richard Weaver, of Fivehead, had been summoned by Lily Payne, of Isle Abbots, to show cause, etc. but the case was adjourned.

The Chard and Ilminster News, 28th September 1901
The Chard and Ilminster News, 28th September 1901

Then on 2nd November 1901, again in the Chard and Ilminster News...

SETTLED CASES. -...The case adjourned from the last Court in which Richard Weaver was summoned by Lily Payne to show cause, etc., had also been satisfactorily arranged by the parties.

The first article mentioned that Richard lived in the village of Fivehead which lies between his home village of Curry Rivel in Somerset and Lily's home village of Isle Abbotts. I had no other documentation placing him in Fivehead including the 1901 census when he was living in Curry Rivel only a few months before Laura was born. Nevertheless, I couldn't find any other Richard Weavers in the locality that could have been the father and, of course, we had the DNA too.

Lily Payne was born on 2nd November 1882 and her parents were James Payne and Susan (nee Lewis). Lily was almost 17 years old when she was baptized on 18th October 1899 in Isle Abbots.

I subsequently found Lily had another child called Gwendoline Gertrude Weaver PAYNE baptised in 1908 but born in 1903 so it looks quite possible that Richard had a second child by her.

In 1906, Lily Payne went on to have yet another child called Reginald Harold Marsh Payne but I'm guessing he had a different father called Marsh. Then in 1910, Lily married Thomas Edmonds and they had a son together, Donald Clarence P Edmunds/Edmonds, in 1912. Lily died in 1928 and is buried at Fivehead.

Richard Weaver married Alice Trott in 1906 and, as far as I can tell, they never had any children of their own. Richard had a long career as a postman but started out following in his father's footsteps in the shoemaking business. He took it up again after he retired from the Post Office and died in 1949, being outlived by Alice.

Laura married Herbert Gerald Young in 1923 and had three boys. She died in Bournemouth in 1963.

Gwendoline married Joseph H Manns in 1921 and I believe she died in December the following year after having a daughter called Phyllis.

Reginald married Annie Rebecca Stait in Tidenham, Gloucestershire, in 1929 and they had a daughter. He passed away in Newport in 1986.

Finally Donald married Dorothy L West in 1939 and he died in 1966.

My 2 x great-grandfather, William Henry Weaver, was also illegitimate and, to date, his father is a complete brick wall. Perhaps Sally's and my close family's DNA working in tandem may one day solve this mystery too.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Who am I? What's my name?

Category: DNA


R1b-L21 Descendant Tree borrowed from the 'R L21, Z290 and Subclades FamilyTreeDNA Project'
https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/r-l21/About/Results

(Click the image for a larger version.)

For a number of years I've believed my patrilineal line (my Hibbitt ancestors) dated back to the early 18th century, being located in the village of Exton in the county of Rutland. However, recent DNA discoveries have thrown this into question.

The records I've looked at to date show no sign of a problem but it's looking likely that my family has a NPE (non-paternal event) or misattributed parentage. How do I know this?

I recently started a Facebook Group called Hibbitt/Hibbett (plus other variants) Family History Research Group. There are a number of people in this group who descend from a John HIBBIT & Mary Toft who married in St Pancras, London, in 1770. One member, who is a direct male line descendant of this couple, ran his father's AncestryDNA test through the Morley Y-SNP Subclade Predictor Tool and received a basic haplogroup of R1b-Z2534.

My dad knows his current haplogroup (R1b-Z36747), having taken a number of Y-DNA tests. It can be written as a series of subclades moving forward in time as various mutations arise:
R1b-M343 > P297 > M269 > L23 > L51 > P312 > Z290/S461 > L21 > DF13 > DF21 > S3058 > S424 > S426 > CTS2187/S190 > Z36747

Unfortunately, the Z2534 haplogroup split away from my dad's haplogroup at DF13, a haplogroup which was formed in approximately 2600 BC. The path is:
R1b-M343 > P297 > M269 > L23 > L51 > P312 > Z290/S461 > L21 > DF13 > Z253 > Z2534

Therefore my dad and the descendant of John HIBBIT (m. 1770) cannot share a recent patrilineal ancestor.

At this point I wasn't too concerned as paper records haven't connected the London HIBBIT family to the Rutland HIBBITT/HIBBETT family. I was therefore keen to hear from descendants of my most distant known ancestor (MDKA), John Hybit, who married three times in Exton between 1712 and 1732.

I believed I was descended through John HYBIT's son, William, and so I was pleased to discover that a descendant of John's son, Matthew, had received his AncestryDNA results. He too was a direct male line descendant and very kindly ran his DNA through the Morley Tool. It turns out that he too, received a result of R1b-Z2534.

The conclusion to be drawn from this is that the London HIBBIT group and the Rutland HIBBITT/HIBBETT group share a distant ancestor dating back to about 4600 years ago, give or take a few centuries either way. The likelihood is that if they were to undertake dedicated Y-DNA testing, they would probably find that their common ancestor is much more recent than this and they would also be eligible to join the R-Z253 Project at FamilyTreeDNA.

Unfortunately for me and my close family, it is looking very likely that we are the odd-ones-out. However, I would still be glad if additional, suitable candidates would ascertain their haplogroup so we can be more certain of the facts and to perhaps narrow down precisely in which generation the NPE occurred.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Latest on our Hibbitt Y-DNA kits

Category: DNA

My dad's Y STR test has recently been upgraded to 111 markers. However, as I thought might be the case, he doesn't yet have any matches at this level. This would be because the right men haven't yet taken the test. Hopefully we shall have some men who are descended from John Hybit of Exton, Rutland, testing in the future and then we may begin to discern which markers are related to which branches of the family.

Z36747 men on The Big Tree
Z36747 men on Alex Williamson's 'The Big Tree'

In the meantime, Alex Williamson has begun updating 'The Big Tree'. Initially dad's kit was placed with another kit whose ancestor was called Doggart. However, a new Big Y kit (Chism) has recently arrived and formed a new subclade below Z36747 with Doggart. Dad now sits alone at Z36747 until any closer matches appear.

Note: I've updated my 'Tracing Annie Hibbitt's Deep Ancestral Roots Through Her Dad's Y-DNA' page with these changes.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

How to obtain a Y-DNA haplogroup from an autosomal DNA test for free

Category: DNA


The Morley Y-SNP Subclade Predictor Tool showing my dad's estimated haplogroup
(Click the image for a larger version.)

If you are male and have taken an AncestryDNA, 23andMe or MyHeritage autosomal DNA test, it may be possible to extract some Y-DNA data from your DNA file to obtain an estimated haplogroup. I should emphasize that this isn't a substitute for a dedicated Y-DNA test but it might be useful in pointing you in the right direction for further testing or to see whether you are likely to match with others who share your surname.

It's free to use the Morley Y-SNP Subclade Predictor Tool at https://ytree.morleydna.com/extractFromAutosomal. All you need to do is download your raw data file from one of the three testing companies mentioned above and run it through the tool so there's nothing to stop you having a go. It's very easy to do. There are limitations in that the SNP needs to be present in the Morley tool and in your autosomal DNA test which is why you will only get a basic haplogroup.

This link http://www.geneticgenealogist.net/2017/08/updated-method-to-get-ydna-haplogroup.html provides instructions on how to use your AncestryDNA kit with the Morley Tool.

My dad took the Big Y test at FamilyTreeDNA which gave him a current terminal SNP of Z36747 which can be written as...

R1b-M343 > P297 > M269 > L23 > L51 > P312 > Z290/S461 > L21 > DF13 > DF21 > S3058 > S424 > S426 > CTS2187/S190 > Z36747

Before ordering Big Y, using my dad's AncestryDNA kit and the Morley Tool, my dad's haplogroup was reported as S190. You can see therefore that he made it quite a way down the Y phylogenetic (or evolutionary) tree towards his terminal SNP by simply using his autosomal test.

Likewise, my husband, Harvey, has recently ordered a Big Y test but he's undertaken some SNP testing in the past to give him a subclade of S18890 which can be written as...

R1b-M343 > P297 > M269 > L23 > L51 > U106 > L48 > Z9 > Z30 > Z2 > Z7 > Z8 > Z338 > Z11 > Z12 > Z8175 > FGC12057 > S18890*

The Morley Tool gave him a haplogroup of Z12 which is how I knew to order the L48 SNP Panel at YSEQ. The Big Y will supersede this SNP Panel when the results are back and he might even end up further downstream of the S18890 SNP.

To find out more about these haplogroups and what it means for my HIBBITT family and Harvey's BARNES family click on the following links...
http://www.hibbitt.org.uk/dna/y-dna-hibbitt.html
http://www.hibbitt.org.uk/dna/y-dna-barnes.html

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

Tracing my HIBBITT family through DNA - Can you help?

Category: DNA

Blacksmiths Lane, Exton, Rutland
Blacksmiths Lane, Exton, Rutland
(Photograph kindly supplied by Caroline White, a distant cousin in Oundle, Peterborough.)


I'm seeking men called HIBBITT / HIBBETT or any of the variants listed here, to see whether you would be willing to test your Y DNA. If your name isn't Hibbitt but you suspect you are descended from a direct paternal ancestor with the name, then come on board.

Sorry ladies, we don't possess a Y chromosome but it would still be great to compare if you have taken an autosomal test such as the AncestryDNA, 23andMe, Family Finder or MyHeritage test. If so, please get in touch.

Since my dad took the Big Y DNA test at FamilyTreeDNA we've discovered that an ancestor of ours may have lived in or around the Stirling area of Scotland in Roman times.

Y DNA traces the patrilineal line (eg. father's father's father, etc.) which, in our case, is our Hibbitt line. However, this particular ancestor would have lived in a time before the adoption of surnames.

I've put together a comprehensive account of the history of my Hibbitt line dating from 60,000 years ago to the present day.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE

Through traditional research, I've traced my Hibbitts back to the beginning of the 18th century. I found my 6 x great-grandfather, John Hybit, living in a village called Exton located in the county of Rutland, the smallest county in England.

Dad's DNA matches quite a number of men who have all tested positive for a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) called R-S424, otherwise known as the Little Scottish Cluster. Many men, but not all, in the S424 project at FTDNA trace their ancestry to southern Scotland where their common ancestor is believed to have lived centuries ago.

Just how and when our relatives found their way from Scotland to Rutland remains a mystery but I'm hoping that, as additional data comes in from more Y-DNA testers, we may learn more about the Z36747 subclade which is dad's current terminal SNP. Dad has some novel variants in his Big Y test which may tell us more in the future if another Big Y tester has the same variant(s).

If you are a male called HIBBITT (or a variation of the name) please would you consider taking a Y-DNA test. It doesn't necessarily have to be the Big Y as there may be cheaper options depending on your goals. It may also be possible to obtain some Y DNA data from an autosomal test too. Please contact me if you'd like more information or if you do decide to test.

John Hybit seems to have been the progenitor of so many who carry variations of his name and it would be good to learn whether we are all related and where he might have originated from.

READ ABOUT THE DEEP ANCESTRAL ROOTS OF THE HIBBITT FAMILY HERE

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

DNA testing is getting more popular

Category: DNA

AncestryDNA Matches
Part of my Dad's AncestryDNA Match List

A nice surprise popped up in my family's DNA match lists a couple of days ago. Unknown to me, the grand-daughter of a known cousin on my dad's side took the AncestryDNA test. I still have a few gaps in my family tree and having other close relatives tested makes it easier to narrow down on which side of the family to concentrate the search. My dad was an only child and and so was his mother so my only hope of finding a close cousin is on my dad's father's side so you can imagine how thrilled I was to see this match appear.

I remain hopeful that one day I will be able to discover who my 2 x great-grandfather's parents were. My ancestor, Henry Ridley, was born in Birmingham in about 1841 but this is all I know of him. The new cousin match is also descended from Henry and so anyone matching both her and my dad will point to a match on the Hibbitt/Ridley side of the family.

Noted by Ancestry as a 3rd-4th cousin, the relative is actually a 1st cousin 3 times removed to my dad and shares 144 centimorgans across 8 DNA segments. Because older generations share more DNA, I'm looking forward to other members of her family testing too.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]

And I thought the Cornish were Celts!

Category: DNA

I've been tracing Harvey's deep patrilineal ancestral roots (father's father's father's line etc.) through the use of Y-DNA.

Join me as I journey from 'Adam' in Africa through to the 20th century Barnes family living in Newlyn, Cornwall. You'll meet 10,500 year old cattle herders from Mesopotamia, Bronze Age Scandinavians and Iron Age Germanic tribes. Oh, and not a Celt in sight!

Newlyn properties owned by the Barnes family during the 20th century
Newlyn properties owned by the Barnes family during the 20th century

For those who are interested, Harvey's larger haplogroup is U106 and his subclade is R-S18890*.

Read the full story by clicking HERE.

[Note: All content on the Hibbitt & Barnes Family History website and blog is copyrighted. Click here for conditions of use.]
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